EduSports

Eighty Nine high school seniors were administered a questionnarie that gathered information on their exercise habits (ranging from relay to daily), relationships with parents to peers, depressive tendencies, sports involment, drug use and academic performance. Student with high level exercise had better relationships with their parent (including greater intimacy and more frequent touching), were less depressed, spent more time involved in sports, used drugs less frequently and had higher grade point averages than did student with low level of exercise.

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Academic performance is better if young people play sports competitively, as is clear from the findings of the thesis presented by Ana Capdevila Seder at the Universitat Jaume I. The thesis has been directed by the lecturer of Teaching Body Language and director of the UJI Sports Service Carlos Hernando Domingo.

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5.The Effect of Sports Participation on GPAsThere exists a persistent stereotype that student-athletes are not as academically inclined as non student-athletes. This viewpoint is supported through primarily anecdotal evidence and aggregate level data, which does not reveal the causal effect of sports participation on grades. Is it the case that student-athletes achieve different grades because they are time constrained, or is it because they possess a systematically different academic ability?

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Eighth graders (N = 136) were divided into two groups: students who had participated in at least one interscholastic sport and were classified as athletes (n = 73), and students who not participated in interscholastic sports and were classified as nonathletes (n = 63). The mean grade point average (GPA) for each group and subgroup was computed and compared by group, subgroup, and sex. There were 6 categoies of sports participation, rangingfiom no sports to 5 sports. As interscholastic sports participation increased, GPAs improved.

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